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Chris Rogers
Chris Rogers

Mechanical Engineering Design (8th Ed) With Sol... !FREE!



The purpose of this exam is to evaluate a student's ability to design engineering systems efficiently and effectively. The exam will cover the conception, planning, evaluation and implementation of engineering system designs. Emphasis is placed on engineering systems which are interdisciplinary and typically require the consideration and integration of several of the traditional engineering disciplines. Therefore, to a large extent, success in this examination will depend upon a student's ability to apply design methods and integrate basic knowledge of the engineering sciences. Specific areas which are emphasized in the examination are as follows:




Mechanical Engineering Design (8th Ed) with Sol...



1. Design Methods: Designers should use a systematic and methodical approach when designing engineering systems. Knowledge and understanding about design methods; the identification of design requirements; and continuous quality improvement are examples of the topics examined. A student may be given a statement describing the need for a particular functionality and then be asked to design an appropriate engineering system to satisfy this functionality. A student will be rewarded based on the ability to solve the problem in a sound and systematic way and to identify questions which are worthy of further research.


3. Analysis: The student should appreciate the role of analysis in engineering design and be capable of ascertaining the implications of analysis results during design. One aspect is the ability to use the appropriate engineering science knowledge to analyze a design with respect to the design requirements. For instance, will structural failure occur in the design? A more important aspect is the interpretation of the analysis and the identification of ways to improve the design with respect to the requirements. For instance, how can structural failure be avoided with a minimum of weight increase?


The examination will assume knowledge of material normally covered in the undergraduate core curriculum in mechanical engineering at Georgia Tech, but will presume the maturity and experience commensurate with a graduate student at the master's level. The primary courses to which this examination will relate are: ME 3180 (Machine Design); ME 2110 (Creative Decisions and Design); and ME 4182 (Capstone Design). In addition, ME 4210 (Manufacturing Process and Engineering) will be useful. At the graduate level, ME 6101 (Engineering Design) provides an introduction to a systematic design method and is recommended.


Courses The examination requires a thorough understanding of the material covered in ME 2202 (Dynamics of Rigid Bodies), and ME 4189 (Structural Vibrations). Many of these topics are covered in greater detail in ME 6441 (Dynamics of Mechanical Systems) and ME 6442 (Vibration of Mechanical Systems) , but the examination is set at the undergraduate level. In addition, the exam assumes a familiarity with many concepts from ME 3015 (System Dynamics and Control) including modeling of mechanical systems, transient/steady-state response, and stability.


Courses. The examination will be based on material normally covered in the following undergraduate courses offered in mechanical engineering at Georgia Tech: ME 3345 (Heat Transfer), and ME 4315 (Energy Systems Analysis and Design).


Objective and Scope. The purpose of this examination is to evaluate a student's ability to synthesize and analyze manufacturing processes for various materials. Emphasis will be placed on materials processing techniques, thus typically requiring consideration of several of the traditional engineering disciplines. To a large extent, success in this examination will depend on the ability to integrate and bring to bear upon the problem at hand basic knowledge of the engineering sciences such as mechanics and material properties and, to a lesser extent, design and fluid and thermal sciences. Knowledge of major material processing techniques is expected. Several of the specific areas which may be emphasized in the examination include the following:


Courses. The examination will assume knowledge of material normally covered in the undergraduate core curriculum in Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Tech, but will presume the maturity and experience commensurate with a graduate student at the Master's level. The primary subjects to which this examination will relate to are: MSE 2001 (Principles and Applications of Engineering Materials); ME 4210 (Manufacturing Processes); and ME 4214 (Mechanical Behavior of Materials). The following courses in the areas of design and fluid and thermal science also will be pertinent: ME 3180 (Machine Design); ME 3322 (Thermodynamics); ME 3340 (Fluid Mechanics), and ME 3345 (Heat Transfer). Further, ME 6222 (Manufacturing Engineering and Systems) provides in-depth knowledge of the material at a graduate level, and is suggested for students taking the exam, especially those who did not take ME 4210 as undergraduates.


The student must demonstrate basic concepts in solid mechanics and mechanical behavior of engineering materials. Focus is on material from undergraduate courses, including: basic statics; mechanics of deformable bodies; and mechanical behavior of polymers, metals, ceramics and composites. Basic assumptions and limitations of simple classical beam and torsion theories are stressed, along with fundamental concepts of stress-strain relations, strain-displacement relations, boundary conditions, and simple theories for deformation and failure of engineering materials.


Courses. The examination will be based on materials normally covered in the undergraduate core curriculum in mechanical engineering at Georgia Tech. The primary core subjects to which this examination will relate are ME 3015 (System Dynamics Control). Candidates will also find the material covered in ME 6401 (Linear Control Systems) and ME 6403 (Digital Control Systems) will strengthen their position relative to the examination. However, no questions will be asked that require specialized techniques or advanced concepts which normally would be covered at the graduate level.


Objective and Scope. Candidates should be familiar with the basic principles of thermodynamics and their application to evaluating the properties of simple substances and ideal mixtures and to analyzing representative engineering systems at an academic level of complexity. Expected familiarity and possible and exemplary topics follow:


1. Basic Principles: Includes the Zeroth law and the energy and entropy principles, heat and various common forms of work, and the properties of pure substances, ideal gases, and ideal gas mixtures. Students should be familiar with these elementary principles and capable of applying these principles to engineering systems.


4. Engineering Applications: Students should be very familiar with the common power and refrigeration cycles including the well established gas and vapor cycles. Nevertheless, exams typically challenge the student to analyze sometimes subtle or sometimes disparate variations on these cycles, so students should have developed an independent capacity to analyze representative engineering systems. Basic familiarity must include the following: (1) Common gas cycles such as the Carnot and Stirling cycles and the air standard Otto and Diesel and similar cycles, (2) Vapor Cycles to understand include the basic steam cycle and the steam cycle with superheat, reheat, and extraction and similar vapor power cycles (3) Refrigeration Cycles to include the Carnot and vapor compression cycles for refrigeration and heat pumping. Students should be familiar with the classical systems and cycles studied in undergraduate courses but should also be capable of analyzing and discussing both typical enhancements and novel or unusual variations. Students are usually not tested on applications far removed from main-stream applications in thermal and fluid power, thermal processing, refrigeration, heat pumps, and the thermodynamics of fluid and heat transfer machinery.


Objective and Scope. The purpose of this exam is to evaluate a student's ability to apply the fundamental principles underlying computer-aided engineering to design and analysis problems in mechanical engineering. Emphasis will be placed on real systems which are subject to more than one physical phenomena (compressive and transverse loading, mechanical and thermal loading, etc.). The student should appreciate the role of computer-aided analysis in engineering design and be capable of ascertaining the implications of analysis results. To a large extent, success in this examination will depend upon the student's ability to integrate and apply basic knowledge of the engineering sciences to the formulation and solution of problems using numerical and computational methods. Specific topics emphasized in the examination include the following:


-Geometric Modeling: Curve and surface modeling techniques. Given an engineering design problem, which curve/surface modeling technique would be appropriate, based on an understanding of fundamental technique properties and analysis of problem requirements? Why are components shaped the way they are and how would their shape be described (using CAD systems)? Other topics include the limitations of curve and surface models and the application of geometric modeling to shape design and component analysis, with analysis related to the formulation of finite element and other types of models.


Courses. The examination will assume knowledge of material normally covered in the undergraduate core and elective courses in mechanical engineering at Georgia Tech, but will presume the maturity and experience commensurate with a graduate student at the master's level. The undergraduate courses to which this examination will relate are ME 2016 (Computing Techniques), and ME 4041 (Interactive Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design). At the graduate level, the following courses are recommended: ME 6104 (Computer-Aided Design); ME 6124 (Finite Element Method: Theory and Practice). 041b061a72


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